The cinematic world of Bad Choices

Andy created a dystopian world inhabited mainly by strong/interesting/dimensional female characters. This project is called Bad Choices—which is also the name of the town at the center of this conceptual story.

He set his goals high: “I was tired of photographing happy people holding
happy products and pointing at happy screens. I wanted to challenge myself, get outside of my comfort zone”. 
One of Andy’s shots from a shoot for Best Buy
He went well beyond any comfort zones. Andy’s photography always tells a story regardless of the assignment, but to create a personal body of work that he could really sink his teeth into he needed something bigger. Many of his personal tastes and inspirations comes from the world of sci-fi, so he decided to start there. The project began as a character study with 12 different actors, and quickly became a full blown dystopian screenplay with overlapping story lines.
Early stages mind map
From each actor study, Andy started by painstakingly concepting and creating the key poster art for each character. One by one, the story has slowly revealed itself. He’s taken the project through 2 artist retreats on Anderson Island— using mind mapping, film research and creative brainstorming, all funneling in to the creation of the conceptual photographic scenes.
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He knew he couldn’t attempt this project by himself, and so he reached out to a crew of talented artists to ask them to contribute to the project. He first reached out to Hair and Makeup Stylist Terri Lodge to help flesh out and design FX driven makeup to represent each of the characters.
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Costume designer Rebecca Therkelsen was then quickly brought on to collaborate with Andy on the costuming, digging into the backstory of each character, to create a unique wardrobe for each of them.
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Art Director and Prop Master Ron Skrasek jumped at the chance to play in a post-apocalyptic world. His ability to transform words into key prop and set pieces have been critical to the visual storytelling.
Location scouting for our very first scene of Bad Choices.
Camera Assistant Galvin Collins was brought on as a key resource, contributing to all areas of production, including prop-making.

 

Naturally, Therese was responsible for logistics and project management, with critical help from Production Assistant Misty Post, who also worked as a prop wrangler and prop maker.
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Designer Adam Murdoch also gave significant time and guidance to Andy and the project. His combination of graphic design and brand experience gave the project an immense amount of focus. Adam’s unique process created an amazing brand story and design for Bad Choices.
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What’s next for Bad Choices? 

We are very excited to announce that in less than 2 weeks, we are shooting a new phase of the project, this time with the support of Lensbaby. Andy will be shooting with some of their top secret gear, and we’ll be taking the talent to the location. We can’t wait to add to this project. Until then, you can see all the images from the world of Bad Choices here!
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6 of 7 completed character portraits from the series. 5 more to go!
And now I have a treat for you. Because you just read the entire post! That deserves a bunny!
Bunny don’t F around! You’re welcome.

My 4 minute shoot with the real Tommy Wiseau

Dramatic entertainment photographer Andy Batt shoots actor Tommy Wiseau
Andy’s shoot with Tommy Wiseau

“This is probably wrong, but it’s how I remember it. I think Jason called me the day of, asking if he could use my studio to interview Tommy Wiseau. That guy from The Room. The “Oh Hai Mark” guy. I’d heard many stories about Tommy from Jason. There was no way I would turn down a chance to have Tommy in the studio.

Jason and Ian showed up with Tommy. He’s a whirlwind of energy, kinda crazy, kinda edgey, but also incredibly friendly. He’s intense. He’s nuts. He’s indescribable. Jason and Ian shot a couple episodes of  Tommy Explains It All — I learned all about Tommy’s Thoughts on Kissing, and his Secrets to Success. After they wrapped the video, I grabbed an opportunity to photograph Tommy—you don’t get the creator of The Room in your studio and not photograph him.

There’s no directing Tommy. He’s got very specific ideas about what looks cool, and a style that is all his own. The only way is to flow with him and let him take you on an adventure. I shot one test at 2:41pm. He jumped, posed, yelled, spun, squatted, invented a new pose, re-styled his belt, did some Mick Jagger poses, gave me the Victory sign, thumbs up, stuck his tongue out, made explosion sounds, vogued, and jumped some more. He was done at 2:45. In 4 minutes and 77 pictures he gave me a crazy amount of energy. After that Tommy really wanted to do group shots with everyone. I got to do a “cool guy back-to-back” pose with Tommy!

Tommy flew out of the studio in a cloud of crazy energy, just the way he came in, leaving me dazed in his wake.”

We can’t wait to see The Disaster Artist in the theater– in the meantime, here’s a few of the images.

Tommy Wiseau poses with photographer Andy Batt

77 photographs in 21 seconds

Curious Comedy Showdown – Six players enter the stage. Only one will survive.

CURIOUS COMEDY SHOWDOWN

Dramatic entertainment photographer Andy Batt created these hilarious portraits and video for Curious Comedy Theater’s Showdown improv comedy showcase.

See the final results here!

Six players enter the stage. Only one will survive. Often referred to as “The Hunger Games of Comedy” the Curious Comedy Showdown pits Curious Comedy’s finest players against one another in competitive improv matches that will make you laugh until you cry. Armed only with audience suggestions and razor-sharp wit, the players must create fast-paced hilarious scenes on the spot to win audience votes – round after round – in hopes of living to see another day.

Andy and artistic director Stacey Hallal sat down to hash out concepts, while Andy sketched some of his ideas. They agreed to the idea of a spoof on cowboys and the Wild West, and the final results are very close to those original sketches.

Featuring improv comedy performers Hallie Zmroczek, Audrey Butler, Matt Lask, Jenn Hunter, Eric Simons, Craig McCarthy, Tyler Quinn, Sarah JK Shoemaker, Nick Condon, Chad Parsons, Nathan Loveless, Bill McKinley, Chris Williams, Jay Flewelling, Laura Sams, Chase Padgett, Stacey Hallal.

Andy’s sketches during initial conversations about the shoot.